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Will blue wine replace rosé this summer?

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Two years ago, the existence of Spanish blue wine was reveled to us.

Unfortunately, it was hard to get your hands on, unless you were visiting the U.S. or certain European cities and had a bottle shipped to an address there.

No need for transatlantic or cross-border flights to source vino azul anymore.

This summer, Naked Grape Blue ($10.45, exclusive to Wine Rack for a limited time) is promising to be the new summer tipple. Intrigued, I took a bottle along to a friend’s cottage to see what kind of reaction it would garner.

“Is that colour natural?” was the immediate query, as we stared at the pool water-hued wine that we poured to accompany our lunch. Conversation starter? Check. (FYI: the label just lists “colour” as one of the ingredients.)

Then it was time for the real test: taste. It had the aroma of tropical fruit juice mix. On first sip, it was sweet with lingering notes of passionfruit. Simply, it tasted like juice.

“It’s like a slushie,” said one friend, laughing. Nostalgia factor? Check. It also made sense that the entire marketing campaign, “Bluésay All Day,” clearly took inspiration from frosé (frozen rosé), which was the unofficial summer drink of 2016.

“It’s like Kool-Aid with alcohol,” declared another cottager. Easy drinking? Check. The alcohol level comes in at just six per cent, so there’s no discernible alcohol flavour. Imbibers, operate caution as it could go down a little smoother than you’d like.

And that was it. No one asked for a refill. By dinnertime, blue wine was forgotten. It was definitely not replacing rosé, or the pinot grigio we had chilling.

What it would work great as is a frozen cocktail base or as a welcome drink for a vacation-themed birthday bash. Maybe even a summery “bluésay versus frosé” brunch. Or frozen as ice cubes a for boozy touch to lemonade. Other than that, I’ll pass.

Oh and just so you know, blending blue wine with rosé doesn’t turn it purple. We tried.

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